The One Thing We Forget About Getting Stuff Done

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Do=Natural flow of action, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 2 min.

We spend much of our energy on getting everything done either by ourselves or through others. But there never seems to be enough time. So we stress and steam and push and plead to get everyone into action and producing.

But we regularly leave out one thing that would simplify things and speed the results we seek: trust.

When we trust that everything works out for us, that others are fundamentally good, and that we can handle anything that comes up, we pave the way. People gain confidence, we are not bogged down in stress, and results come shockingly quickly and well.

Most of us have seen how this trust works. But in the tension of the day and against the backdrop of the what the world generally believes, we forget. The sooner we remember that the key is, “believing is seeing”–not the other way around–the easier it will be.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: This version of trust means that we feel good about the desired results–as if they have already occurred–before they actually show up. If we feel bad, we aren’t trusting and will fall back into the slower, more stressful way: doing stuff to make things happen.

PPS: What does it look like to feel good before the results show up? It will be different for each person. To get started, try doing a ladder exercise with “how it is now” at the bottom of the ladder and the desired results at the top. Once you get to the feeling at the top, it will be very easy to see how to trust, feel good, and jump into inspired action.

PPPS: And it will become easy for others to pick up on your excitement and get inspired themselves.

PPPPS: Trust does not supplant action. As we trust, we will see the next best thing to do: make that call, write that note, work that spreadsheet. But we won’t be acting to feel better and cause a result. That’s so important.

 

Today’s photo credit: Ulf Bodin Uppsala, March 21, 2015 via photopin (license)

The Long Game

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

Driving a bargain, cutting a corner, or forcing a result are ways of playing the short game. We gain but it doesn’t last because someone else has lost. Having thus chipped (or hacked?) away at the foundation of relationships, we end up unable to realize the peace, power, and profit of true partnership.

Let us always play the long game.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Pauline Guilmot cc

How to Communicate Through A Very Narrow Pipe

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Sales and Influence, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

Language is a very narrow pipe. Depending on the mindset of our listener, what we say can come across a little or a lot differently than we intend. We cannot rely solely on words to communicate clearly, completely.

The most important thing we can do to improve the chances that we communicate well is to regularly build a solid foundation of trust with everyone who matters. Where there is trust, there is more leeway, less defensiveness, and a greater likelihood that we will be on the same page as we communicate.

We can also listen more and flex to their style (that is, their preferred way of working with people, tasks, and information) by matching pace, tone, and body language. And we can confirm mutual understanding, go for win-win, and follow up with written confirmations of agreements.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: tanakawho cc

Better Business Decisions

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Strategy
Reading time: 1 min.

We will make much better business decisions when we slow down. We will then be able to take some time, go for win-win, ask a few trusted advisors, and use our logic plus our gut-smarts.

We need not slow down too much.  But we do have to give up on the myth that our value is in coming up with the answers.  Our job is to make sure that decisions are made well and in a timely way

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Brandon Carpenter cc

Control Yields Crappy Results

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

To get things done consistently well with a team, the correct flow or equation is Trust → Honest Discussion → Real Commitment → True Accountability → Desired Results.

If we don’t trust that they will do the work, we will try to get results by demanding, controlling, conniving, or micromanaging. Then the flow will always become Crappy Results ← Excuses ← Grudging Compliance ← Saying Whatever ← Distrust.

We must find a way to start with trust, not control. The good news is that it takes just one person to open up. One trust-building interaction leads to all the rest. Be that one person.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Seabamirum cc

The Fundamental Challenge for Teams

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

The fundamental challenge for any team of two or more people is trust. When there is lack of trust, issues about who does what, who has the ideas, who sets the agenda, and who gets credit bloom into conflict, politics, and poor results.

To build trust in a team, we start with ourselves. We choose to see things differently. We trust that it’s not personal, that there are room and abundance for all here, and that we can handle whatever comes up, when it comes up, should it come it.

When we make that shift, the conflict, politics, and poor results melt away because they have nothing to push against anymore.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Trust me; it’s true.

 

Today’s photo credit: . .. a.k.a. Dobi. cc

zoom

Zooming Things Faster

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Do=Natural flow of action, Leading, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

Wherever we see a lack of speed at work, we will find a lack of trust in self, in others, and between others. Instead of pushing to go faster, let’s slow down and build trust.

We build trust by being trustworthy, by respecting and believing in them and us, and by holding each other accountable. We start by–you guessed it–raising our buzz.

And then, zoom!

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Sam Javanrouh cc