Why We Needn’t Hire The Experienced

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Hiring
Reading time: 1 min.

Back in day, when things were more Industrial-Age-same-same, we could hire people based on their experience. The question, “Have they done this successfully elsewhere?” was a decent proxy for, “Will they do this successfully here?”

Not anymore.

Everything is unique, now. That they did it there is no guarantee at all that they will do it here. Far more important is fit. We can only answer the question, “Will they do this successfully here?” by discovering if they have the talent, attitude, values, drive, and caring to deliver what’s needed for this role, in this organization, at this time.

Yes, this is harder than simply finding someone whose done it elsewhere. And it is necessary if we want to make sustained, successful hires.

In your corner,

Mike

PS: The good news is that, because we are no longer limited to choosing people with experience, we have a richer, broader pool to draw from.

PPS: When a role demands a certain amount of mental- or emotional maturity, we will often but not always find that in people with more life experience.

levers

The Four Team Building Levers

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

There are four levers we can use to build a great team. Sometimes we need to hire new talent. Sometimes we need to fire because we have the wrong talent. Sometimes we need to coach people to awaken talent. And sometimes we need to change the entire structure of the team because the right people can’t apply their talents; they are in the wrong jobs or the jobs and environment have changed.

None of these levers is better than the other. But we usually default to just one when the team isn’t working well. The trick is to use all four and balance them.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Let’s think of talent in the broadest definition here. It includes (ranked from most important to least) attitude, intra- and interpersonal strengths, experience, and technical skills.

 

Today’s photo credit: Grant Palmer Photography via photopin cc

doc

Career Checkup

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Career, Sweetspot
Reading time: 1 min.

The criteria: Our work is successful and meaningful to the extent that it uses our talents, engages our passions, meets our needs/wants/desires, and helps others (individuals and/or organizations) solve problems that we find compelling or interesting.

With these criteria in mind, let’s do a career checkup. Explore the following questions. Write down your answers.

How would you rank your current work against those four criteria? How could you adjust your current work to better match these criteria? What projects, roles, or businesses could you do next that would best match these criteria? What obstacles might stand between you and your next career move? Finally, how might you navigate past those obstacles?

So, Doc, how is the patient doing?

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Dr.Farouk via photopin cc

Can They Do the Job?

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Hiring
Reading time: 1 min.

“Can they do the job?” is the question we commonly seek to answer when hiring. We use their résumés, interviews, and references to learn what they have done before and determine whether they can do what we need.

Of course, the best person for the job may not be the one with all skills or all the experience. We all have seen skilled and accomplished people fail after we hired them.

What we missed in those cases was attitude and fit. The other questions we need to ask are, “Will this person add to or detract from our culture as it is now and as we desire it to be in the near future? Can we work with them? What about our organization would prevent or support this person achieving the desired outcomes of this role?”

We still are asking the question, “Can they do the job?” Just a bit more broadly.

In your corner,

Mike

jump in

Jump In

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

We often think about doing something new (starting a business, making a product, taking a stand, making a difference) and stop because we lack confidence.  We say, “I’ve never done this before. I don’t know how to do this. I am not sure I have what others have when it comes to doing this.  So I had better not.”

While experience can give some confidence, it can’t be all of it. Consider: if only people who have done a thing before have the necessary confidence to do it again, who did that thing the first time?

It turns out that confidence really comes from recognizing that we already have most of what’s needed. We can handle it even if we’ve never seen it before. We draw confidence from such already-there skills as determination, listening, asking, focusing on others’ wins as well as our own, handling deftly whatever happens, and learning.

Jump in.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: theunquietlibrarian via photopin cc

field

Move to a New Field

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Career
Reading time: 1 min.

Who says that you cannot move to a new field or industry because you only have experience in your current field? Plenty of people make that kind of move.

Yes, when you move into a new field, there are technical aspects you need to learn. And you bring with you all your talents (e.g. your ability to lead, collaborate, organize, dream, envision, plan,  describe,  etc.), general world experience,  and passion. These aspects are twice as important than technical skills in determining your capability, value to others, and success.

Yes, when you move into a new field, you need to acquire a network of new people. And you bring with you your existing network. You don’t lose those people. You simply expand your network to include people in your new field. This benefits everyone including people in your old network, people in your new network, and you.

Yes, of course you can move to a new field. Learn how who you are and what you do will benefit people in your new field.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: A Guy Taking Pictures via photopin cc

talent

Respect Your Talents

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Sweetspot, What=Compelling Focus
Reading time: 1 min.

Many of us don’t respect our talents. We often deny having any talents (we each have them). Or we think that our qualities are not that special. We think, “Doesn’t everyone do this?”

No, they don’t.

Respecting your talents is one of the important steps in plotting your career direction. And it is important all the other times when you are not plotting. When you respect…when you no longer deny your talents, we all benefit.  You feel great whenever you use your unique constellation of talents. We benefit from having those talents applied to the situations we face.

And you further benefit from our gratitude.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Gog Llundain via photopin cc

funnel

Talent Funnel

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Hiring, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 2 min.

“I can’t grow because I don’t have the right people.”

As leaders, we must find the right people, get them in the right roles, and have them working very well together. And we often have trouble finding good people. Here’s one good way to go: build a talent funnel.

Like a sales funnel, a talent funnel helps you track and nurture over time the relationships with people in your network who might someday join or take another role in your organization. Metaphorically, people at the widest part of the funnel are people you suspect might fit well with your organization but with whom you have not yet had conversations about that possibility. At the next level are people with whom you have explored the possibilities. Next come the people who you’ve spoken with about one or more specific roles. The final level contains people you are actively engaging to join your organization.

Fill your talent funnel with people you know (including people already in your organization) and the people who others in your network know. Follow a plan to stay in touch with everyone in the funnel. With your talent funnel in place, you can grow, take advantage of opportunities, and maintain your organization’s brand as one that gets it.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

PS: If you like this idea and wonder if you could manage a talent funnel system, consider partnering with a progressively minded recruiting company. Work with them to build a system that helps you manage and keep private your talent funnel. They can augment your funnel with traditional talent searches as needed. They will earn fees for those searches and for helping you grow and nurture your talent funnel.

Today’s photo credit: El Bibliomata via photopin cc

No Lights Under Bushels, Please

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Sweetspot, What=Compelling Focus
Reading time: 1 min.

I believe that you can believe that you have limited or no talents. Given the thought habits that we have in our culture and that we pass down to our kids, I can see how you might end up convinced that you have nothing very special.

You are wrong, of course. You are very important. You have a unique constellation of talents. And we need you to bring them to bear to help as and where only you can.

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Yes, you.

Management by Pop Quiz

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Leading, Organizations, Sweetspot
Reading time: 2 min.

Long ago, companies were run by standardizing, squeezing out waste, and controlling everything. To make that work, employees were expected to know stuff that kept the machinery running. At a moment’s notice, they had to spout things like sales figures, what the competition was doing, internal rates of return, and inventory turns by SKU. It was like management by pop quiz. And everyone learned that their value to the company–in addition to compliance–was the sum of what they knew.

That was then. Companies today know that those who continue to focus on efficiency are merely fighting to get to the bottom. They must now engage and delight. The old pop quizzes are useless. It’s now management by inspiration. What today’s companies need from you are your talents, heart, and empathy. They need your sense of possibility. Your ability to collaborate is precious to them.They thrive on your ability to span and help others span the gap between what is true now and what is wanted.

Oh, and if your company still has a bit of the ‘management by pop quiz’ going on, that’s OK. Just use your talents, heart, empathy, etc. to help them span that gap.

In your corner,

Mike