It Only Takes One

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It only takes one person to rise above the drama. It only takes one person to remember the big picture. It only takes one person to commit to the (thus far) impossible. It only takes one person to know that it will all work out better than expected.

It only takes one person because when they do, others notice and follow suit.

Why not let it be you today?

 

In your corner,

Mike

Slow Start

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Why not start today slowly? Before diving into email, calls, or meetings, try sitting quietly for a minute (or three), breathing deeply slowly. Then notice the contrast.

My guess? It’ll be rewarding enough to repeat tomorrow.

 

In your corner,

Mike

Put On Your Mask First

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That people around us are struggling, blaming, deflecting, or otherwise full of drama does not mean that we need to do the same.

You see, no amount of us struggling, etc. can ever help them. If we’re down, we can’t help them. Only when we are plugged in, feeling good can we ever have the energy, ideas, and resources to help them.

Put on your mask first, good leader, then help.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s image courtesy of K. Todd Storch

How To Do What’s Hanging Over You

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Do=Natural flow of action, Will=Our inner game
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You know that thing you need to do? The one that’s uncomfortable and hanging over you?

We intellectually know that things will be better when we finally just do it. But how to get past the FUDWARG (fear, uncertainty, doubt, worry, anger, regret, guilt) that makes it uncomfortable and stalls or stops us?

One good way: focus on why this thing you need to do is valuable. Consider in rich detail how it’s in line with what you value, how it will generate all sorts of benefits, and how much better it will feel when it’s not hanging over your head. Focus long enough so that the reasons why far outweigh the FUDWARG.

Then, feeling so much better, do it.

 

In your corner,

Mike

How Do You See This One Sentence?

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in We=All Who Matter, Will=Our inner game
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When we are running on battery power and drained, the tools, insights, and approaches that we most need sound wrong. Plugged in, we will see these tools, insights, and approaches as not only right but as tender gifts.

Take this one for instance: “You are 100% responsible for everything that happens in your life.”

(Yes, we’re going here. Hang on; it’ll be worth it.)

On battery power, that comment is at least misguided and at most insulting, disrespectful, inconsiderate, hurtful, and even hateful.

When we are plugged in, that comment is at least a welcome challenge and at most a precious gift, a badge of honor and belonging, and a joyful reminder of our birthright.

How can one sentence–nay, one word: responsible–be so differently interpreted? Easily: it depends on our charge, on how recently we’ve plugged in (that is, how recently we’ve spent even a few minutes focusing our attention on whatever we appreciate). The same is true for all great wisdom: we are one, there is only the present, start with only the first step, boldness is rewarded, feel good then act, everyone is doing the very best they can, thoughts of good and bad miss the point, thoughts create the world, there is only love, it all makes sense, you belong, etc.

If you saw that “100% responsible” statement as something negative, try this experiment. Spend just 15 minutes noticing and writing down anything and everything you appreciate. It can be in the world or in you, near or far, small or large, mundane or profound. You may need to wait for 20 seconds or so to notice your next thing to appreciate. If you find yourself drifting into anything that feels bad, set aside that thought and return to appreciation. Pay special attention to things you think you should appreciate but that feel bad to consider or are wrapped up in things you really don’t appreciate. Set these aside and find something, anything to appreciate.  When you are done, go back a reread the “100%” comment. What do you notice?

Nice, yes?

Teach this to your team, good leader. With enough of this going around, we’ll be hard pressed not to succeed.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Ahd Photography cc

We Are Like Our Smartphones

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Will=Our inner game
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Like our smartphones, we can run on battery or plug in.

We can go for a while on battery but eventually we will start dragging. On low battery, we feel bad. We blame what must be broken things in other people, the situation, or ourselves. Our effectiveness, enjoyment, and achievements drop.

Plugged in and fully charged, we feel wonderful, take responsibility for everything, and find things getting done with ease. Life is delicious.

Plugging in means nothing more than putting our attention on what we appreciate, what feels good, what we love. Thought by thought, we feel better and better until we’re fully charged. Meditation, connection to something higher, or any of the buzz raising tools would work.

It is tempting to try to stay plugged in and fully charged. But that’s neither possible nor desirable. The worry we would feel about trying to stay plugged in is all it takes to unplug us. And running on battery is needed to experience life. Like our cell phones, we are made to wander in and wonder at the world in all its glory and all its mess. From what we see, we guide our lives. We pick new things we want to have, experience, and accomplish from the mix of good and bad we’ve noticed. We can’t do that if we’re always plugged in.

Many of us simply forget about plugging in. Instead, we struggle through our days, drained.

No need. Just plug in.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Solución Individual cc

keep up

No Need to Keep Up

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Many of us subtly push away success. We fear it. We think, “Sure, I want to be more successful. But I am already so busy and bothered. In order to be more successful, I’d have to do more of this and more of that. I’d have to give up lots of this other thing, too. How could I possibly do everything required?”

Our fears are unfounded. More success comes easily when you understand the source of success. It ain’t hard work, sacrifice, or becoming someone you’re not. (Though conscious choices and trade-offs can be part of it.) You need not try to keep up. The amount of effort required to succeed drops as you use the levers of plugging in, raising your buzz, and focusing (also here).

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: wildphotons via photopin cc

plug in

Every Day, Please

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Meditate, pray, read. Go for a walk, have a cup of tea, do yoga, get a hug.

Give a hug, watch your child sleeping, stretch, skip, scratch behind your cat’s ears.

Listen.

Sink that putt, pot that goal, cook a meal.

Do any other exercise, dream, write, paint, pet your dog, celebrate, appreciate, sing.

Do whatever works for you. Do it every day, please. For everything else to work, you need you and we need you to plug in, raise your buzz, and feel great.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Ours is a world of great adventure, success, and delight. If you’re not feeling it, try some of the above until you do.

 

Today’s photo credit: squeezeomatic via photopin cc

Ego Goes

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Success
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Whenever our day or life seems sucky, there’s a good chance that we have gotten tripped up by ego. The solution is not to tame or suppress our egos but to shift our perspective about what ego really is.

We attribute to our ego all sorts of flaws. We give it the basest motivations. It is the source of all our poor habits. And we blame our egos and other people’s egos when bad things happen. So we are told we must control or defeat our egos.

This is all quite amusing since our egos don’t really exist. They are projections, figments, explanations. They are symptoms. They are scapegoats. They are what we think we are when we are what I call “running on battery power” versus “being plugged into the mains.”

The more we run on battery power, the more we see life as a harsh puzzle. We then spend lots of energy trying hard to figure out how to survive life. Ego is the set of thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors that we think we are when we run on battery power.

The more we are plugged in, the more we see life as a fun game, as an experiment or as an adventure of our own making. Plugged in, we find life compelling. We appreciate, celebrate, and honor more. We engage what we care about, we employ our talents, we live, and we–in any way–help others to live. We feel good.

And the more we are plugged in, the more the illusion of ego fades away.

Plug in, then.

In your corner,

Mike

hold on

It’s Not How Long You Stay

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As I mentioned earlier, whenever you reach a zone where you are happy, quietly excited, and seeing unexpected miracles, you are plugged in. Once there, business flows, problems melt, and you breathe easier. The temptation is to try to stay “plugged in.” Please don’t.

Trying to hold on to that zone comes from a deeper fear that life can’t be this good and that, somehow, you always will (which you won’t) return to the lower, bad-feeling, and battery-draining unplugged zone.

It’s not about staying plugged in. It’s about how quickly you can recognize you are unplugged and plug yourself back in.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Keep plugging back in and plugging back in.

 
Today’s photo credit: ehpien via photopin cc