super

We Change Everything

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

When we raise our buzz, we can change an encounter, a team meeting, an entire company, or even a life for the better just by our presence. Buzz running high, we become certain of their ability to do good and great work regardless of prior success or failure. We let ourselves follow our curiosity about how they will do it and how it will all unfold. Then, lo, they do it and it all unfolds better than any of us could have planned.

Never underestimate your ability to change everything.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Note I didn’t say we can make people change. Nor do we need to do very much.

Today’s photo credit: Nancy <I’m gonna SNAP! cc

wise

Good Leadership, Wise Business

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

The sages tell us that there are only two reactions to anything: fear or love. Nothing else. So if we catch ourselves feeling bad or trying to attack, avoid, complain, or criticize anything, we are in fear.

The solution to whatever we fear is to love it. This does not mean we should accept something that is unacceptable. It means that we are to pause and wait for a better-feeling, more love-centered solution than attack, avoid, etc. (This works wonderfully well, by the way.)

At work, this looks a lot like good leadership and wise business practices.

 

In your corner,

Mike

Today’s photo credit: merec0 cc

change

You Change First

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

Changing an organization is hard. But change in our organizations is near impossible if we, as leaders, don’t change ourselves first.

Changing ourselves is simple (but not easy), though. We start by asking, “Who do I need to be so that the organization can change as desired?”

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: m.a.r.c. cc

hands in

Leadership Is Not (Really) About Getting Stuff Done

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

Getting angry, pushing, directing, pleading, blaming, or doing the tasks ourselves are sure signs that we have fallen into into the trap of thinking that our job as leaders is to make others get stuff done.

Our job is to build an environment for others to get stuff done. We want the team to take charge, select the best stuff to do, then get it done together, well, and on time. And so we use tools like vision and goals, coaching and encouragement, just the right amount of structure, listening, team building, team process, and the hiring of smart, driven, and nice people.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: AGB in AR cc

soar

Cause Their Performance To Soar

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

Communicating our belief in others’ ability to accomplish something–even if it’s difficult, even if they’ve never done it before–is an essential leadership talent.

Such a vote of confidence awakens their talents, increases their engagement, and causes their performance to soar.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Part of the trick is not thinking that we are being merely delusional.

 

photo credit: Flybe Bombardier Dash 8 Q400, AMS via photopin (license)

we are the leaders

We Are The Leaders

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

We are the leaders. More than half of the successes and failures of our organizations are down to us as leaders. Our organizations–whether they succeed or struggle–are mirrors of our leadership.

We are the leaders. Leadership is the edge that we hone. This is where we find the leverage we need slay the dragons, win clients’ hearts, and do compelling work.

Yes, some of the things that go wrong are “their fault.” But we have to change first. We are the leaders.

 

In your corner,

Mike
Today’s photo credit: www.ubikwit.net cc

bz

They Will Show Us How Well We Are Leading

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

Look at their eyes. If their eyes are shining, you know you’re doing it.

– Benjamin Zander
Conductor, Boston Philharmonic

We can tell how well we are leading because the people we’re leading will show us. Are they terrified, checked-out, overwhelmed, or whinging? Then we had better pull up our socks.

Or are their eyes shining? Are they happy, engaged, ready, and positive? Then well done us!

Lead on.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Pop!Tech cc

compass

Knowing When To Lead Differently

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

We nimble leaders have four ways to lead. We can conduct, coach, collaborate, or convene. We select a way to match the situation:

  • We conduct in emergencies and when others need to build competence (when we need to show them how).
  • We coach when others need to build confidence, build capacity, and when we no longer want to do a particular chunk of work ourselves.
  • We collaborate when the problem or its solutions are bigger than any of us.
  • We convene to give great people a structure for success lest they trip over each other and tumble into politics or chaos.

Of course, there are many times when we will use two, three, or four of these at once.

Lead on.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Theresa Thompson cc

carrot sticks

No Carrots. No Sticks.

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

Traditional notions of management are great if you want compliance. But if you want engagement, self-direction works better.

– Dan Pink

Despite all we’ve learned about how horribly ineffective it is, we still tend to use the old carrot and stick method. What really motivates us and the people we lead? These four inner needs:

  • Fit: knowing how we belong; what we expect of ourselves, what others expect of us, and what we expect of others,
  • Autonomy: the freedom to do as we want,
  • Mastery: continuous improvement in our chosen craft, and
  • Meaning: contributing to something larger than ourselves.

You’ve probably guessed that it’s our job as leaders to help people achieve in these four ways. No carrots. No sticks.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: How? Start by asking about and listening to what each team member thinks is the gap between their current and desired fit, autonomy, mastery, and meaning.

HT to Dan Pink for pointing out 3 of these needs so succinctly.

 

Today’s photo credit: Angelina Earley cc