So, You Say You Want Better Results

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Do=Natural flow of action, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 2 min.

Okay. Maybe we are convinced that jumping into action to get desired results is problematic. Perhaps there is something useful in raising our buzz–that is, to feeling good–then acting as inspired to generate better results. But why does raising our buzz seem so difficult?

Mostly, it’s because we are fighting age-old, inherited habits. We are so used to (1) reacting to outside influences and (2) thinking that we have to figure things out and get into action to handle those outside influences. Any attempt we make to raise our buzz (that is, feeling good despite the outside influences) presses against those two habits. It is hard to do. But here’s the thing: saying it’s hard makes it harder. (See?)

So we need a way to gently, lightly move ourselves away from reacting to outside influences and toward an inner-generated, high-buzz perspective.

What works is starting with small, daily practice. Being playful about it also helps. It is especially useful to do this practice as we are going to bed and as we wake up. It takes just a few minutes each time. Within a few days, we will notice a difference. And inside a month, whoa!

Keep going.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Arya Ziai September 13, 2013 at 09:58PM via photopin (license)

It’s Very Hard Work

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Do=Natural flow of action, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

We talk about approaching our piles of tasks with ease. We note how jumping into action when feeling tense, angry, or otherwise bad about stuff is counterproductive. And we at least suspect that taking the time to first feel good then act is a smart way to go.

Yet many people complain that we advocate being lazy, not getting stuff done, or ignoring what’s important. They insist that success comes primarily from hard work.

And there, they are right.

It takes lots of hard work–focus, concentration, discernment, and organization–to replace our habit of jumping into action with a habit of doing whatever it takes to first feel good, then act as inspired. When we do, though, wow!

Gotta do the right hard work.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Amanda Slater from Coventry, England (Suffolk Horses Ploughing) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

re: Never Mind the Pile

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Do=Natural flow of action, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

A large pile of tasks can make us feel anxious, annoyed, or apoplectic. We think that these feelings are a reaction to the pile–a call to buckle down, push harder, and make stuff happen.

Nope.

That feeling is the wiser part of us sending us a memo: “Never mind the pile. You’re fine. You’re just thinking about it the wrong way. There’s an easier, more fulfilling way. That pile isn’t a threat. Nor are the stories you make up about what would happen if you don’t do them correctly, on time, or to someone else’s satisfaction. What you fear is baseless. Action taken when buzzing low is always counterproductive. Be easy about it all. Things always work out. You will never get through the pile; you’re always adding more. Think of it as a “could do” pile, not a “to do” pile. Breathe. Get perspective. Enjoy the process. You’ve done this before. You’ve got this now. Yes. Feel good, raise your buzz, then act from the ensuing inspiration. Repeat. And enjoy the results.”

Better?

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: The stronger the feeling, the more imperative the memo.

Today’s photo credit: Allysse Riordan Piling up via photopin (license)

The First Law of Emotion

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

Newton had his Laws of Motion. We have the Laws of Emotion. Our First Law is like his first law: Our Moods Tend to Keep Going.

We can’t help but broadcast our attitudes, have them influence others, and then react to them afresh when others reflect them back to us. So when we are up, we tend to stay up. When we are down, we tend to stay down. Unless, that is, we apply a concerted force of discipline.

Why a discipline? We have been so practiced at low-buzz emotions that we all hover lower than any of us would like. This is why raising our buzz and staying there can be so difficult and discouraging. It takes some time and dedication to catch ourselves and use one of the many buzz-raising tools to get up and stay up.

But not much time. And the results are so worth it.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: aldoaldoz Sir Isaac Newton via photopin (license)

Start Anywhere Else

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

Here’s the thing about trying to raise our buzz, trying to feel good so that we can perform better: it can be hard, damn hard, or well near impossible to do while focusing on what we’re feeling bad about.

Next time you want to feel better about a situation, start by feeling better about anything else. Use whatever is at hand. Notice one thing you appreciate, notice another thing, and keep going until you feel better. Then you can turn your attention back to the topic at hand.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: muha… it seems i/u need a break!! via photopin (license)

Standard Stress Strategy Backfires

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

When we fall a bit behind in our work, we deploy our standard strategy: working a bit harder. But when we are feeling overwhelmed, our standard strategy backfires. We try to work harder but, under stress, we are so much less effective. Which makes us feel more overwhelmed, stressed, behind which leads to even crappier work which leads to …

No amount of activity can ever get us out of overwhelm. But feeling good–raising our buzz–will.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Nicolas Garcia
cc

Worthy Investment

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

Which will deliver better results? An action taken while in fear, uncertainty, doubt, worry, anger, regret,  or guilt or the same action taken while in excitement, calm, release, allowing, happiness, love, connection, or peace?

Right.

It’s so worth the investment of time and focus to become the kind of person who more often than not acts from excitement, calm, et cetera.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit:
Nazir Amin
cc

Which is Better: Avoid or Enjoy?

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

There is a vast difference between seeking positive and avoiding negative. It is very difficult to generate positive by avoiding negative. We all want and deserve positive. Avoiding negative just can’t cut it anymore.

At work and in life, set aside what you wish to avoid and tell me what you want to enjoy.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Try this shift as often as you notice you’re focused on the negative. Hint: negative feel bad.

PPS: What is positive and negative can shift. Use your feelings to discern.

 

Today’s photo credit: Alan Levine cc

These Aren’t The Solutions We’re Looking For

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Strategy, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

The solution that we crave will remain frustratingly hidden until we raise our buzz. When we raise our buzz, the solution comes into view. It will be so simple that we will wonder why we hadn’t seen it before.

And if we feel bad while considering, formulating, or enacting any solutions, these aren’t the solutions we’re looking for.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Tom Simpson cc