Chasing

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Hyper, unexamined, superhuman, the need to keep up, and racing to it. Not the product of a strategic decision but an unexamined ramping up of idiocy. This is what many of us mistake for success.

Success really is loving and spending time and attention on what we love.

What do you love?

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: It’s fine if what you love is what you had been chasing. Just ease back to loving it and watch it come closer of its own accord. Never a need to chase.

 

Today’s photo credit: David Goehring cc

Success Is a Way, Not a Goal

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The sages tell us to have goals but not attach to them. They warn us that having too much focus on our goals comes from some subtle belief that achieving goals is difficult or impossible. That subtle belief promotes a struggle-laced busyness which makes goals difficult or impossible to achieve. But what to do instead?

People who are successful have learned that success is a way, not a goal. They achieve goals by being successful. That is they set clear and compelling goals, they choose to go win-win-or-don’t-play with everyone, they maintain a high-buzz attitude, and they deftly select the best things to get done. They don’t stress or struggle. And their goals mostly come to fruition.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: If you catch yourself thinking something like, “When I have this, then I’ll be successful” or “I need that to be successful, happy, free, etc.,” think again.

Today’s photo credit: green ray wood via photopin (license)

When We do the Opposite of What We Really Need to Do

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Wherever we see troubles we can usually find a hidden assumption about scarcity lurking about. Out of a fear of lack or a fear for survival, we do the opposite of what we really need to do: we defend our turf or attack others. This may lead to short-lived gains but will leave us still in fear. Instead, if we collaborate, we generate better ideas that disprove the lack and create sustained security, profit, and joy.

We leaders can apply this insight in business, at home, and around the world. As soon a we see winning as “I win and you win,” or “We win and they win,” everything changes.

In your corner,

Mike

Today’s photo credit: Observing #Earth – ISS Expedition 13 via photopin (license)

When C.J. Fudwarg Comes for a Visit

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C.J. Fudwarg feels so at home that we often forget: C.J. is a most unwelcome guest. Whenever C.J. arrives for a visit, people’s lives take a turn for the worse. All the complaint, judgment, fear, uncertainty, doubt, worry, anger, regret, and guilt make quite a mess of things. As leaders, our job is to send C.J. Fudwarg packing.

The easiest way to do this is to raise our own buzz. This invites others to raise theirs. Unable to stomach a high buzz for very long, C.J. Fudwarg soon decamps.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: David Bamber as Mr. Collins in the 1995 miniseries Pride and Prejudice. © 1995 BBC Films

Complex Brew

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Our businesses are complex brews of people, product, and process. Yet there are only four points of failure, ultimately, in any venture. They are 1) the lack of a clear, compelling, and commonly-comprehended goal, 2) the lack of a clear win for any and all involved, 3) poor systems for getting the right stuff done well, and 4) a lack of constructive, positive thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes.

If your company is brewing any of these, stop and reverse them.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: DSC_0045.jpg via photopin (license)

Give and Get

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The sages tell us that the best way to get what we want is to give it to others first. Sounds like an odd approach. How can we give something away that we don’t have?

The trick is to change the currency of exchange from material to emotional.

Instead of giving and getting stuff or situations, we give the emotion of the stuff or situations we want. If getting a new client, car, job, or any other success brings us feelings like freedom, acceptance, ease, forgiveness, and love, then we start by giving these emotions to others. This feels good to us, opens us up to all the ways the world works, and (strangely) speeds the material stuff and situations our way.

 

In your corner,

Mike
Today’s photo credit: Delicate via photopin (license)

Leadership Defined Quite Well Indeed

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Leadership is the act of ensuring we have a clear, current, commonly understood, and compelling goal. It is also the act of ensuring we have an environment (including culture, norms, and systems) that consistently helps us achieve that valuable goal together.

Right then. Off you go.

 

In your corner,

Mike

bushel

How To Get A Decision Quickly and Painlessly

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Success
Reading time: 3 min.

Most leaders get asked to make bushels of decisions daily. It can be overwhelming for both the people making the decisions and the people asking for the decisions. Here is a good way to ask for a decision from anyone who is busy. Use it next time you need to get direction, insight, or a decision. Or, teach it to the people who ask you for decisions.

How To Get a Decision

First, consider whether you need a decision and if so, what decision do you need and from whom do you need it. Keep in mind, many busy people would prefer to make an informed decision than attend a less-than-structured meeting about the same topic.

Next, formulate the decision request like this:

  1. Issue. Give a one-sentence description of the issue.
  2. Impact. Give a one-sentence description of the impact (to the decider) of this issue.
  3. Options. Present a brief bullet list of the options available to address this issue. If needed, include a “do nothing now” option.
  4. Recommendation. State your recommendation, that is, which of the options you suggest they go with.
  5. Justification. Give your justification. Briefly explain why you recommend this option.
  6. Ask. Ask for the decision. You may get an immediate decision or you may need to negotiate with the decision maker about the time/date by when they will make the decision.

It’s often useful to you and the decider for you to write out these points. If you have detailed information to back up your justification, include it as an addendum rather than as part of your presentation/argument.

Many leaders tend to see meetings and other conversations as ways to dump work on them. They prefer the above approach because it demonstrates to them that you’ve thought things through.

Be prepared. Your decider may have other information about or options in mind for the issue at hand. This is fine. You may need to adjust your request for a decision based on this new information, you may need to accept a choice you hadn’t considered, or you may need to retreat, rethink, and return with a new decision for them to make.

Sometimes we need more than a decision from a busy person. If you are looking for a deeper conversation you can use an abbreviated version of this format to ask for that conversation. State the issue at hand, the impact, and that you would like to have a meeting to explore, get insight, get guidance, etc. Suggest that you could have the discussion now or schedule it for a later time. State your recommendation (now or later) and reason. Then, ask for their preference.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: 1 bushel = 30.2833 litres or 8 gallons. Any way you look at it, that’s a lot of decisions.

 

Today’s photo credit: Rob MacEwen cc