Suppose We Don’t

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Sales and Influence, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1

Suppose we cut corners? Suppose we feather our nests? Suppose we get while the getting is good? Suppose we compete on price? Suppose we sue? Suppose we press our advantage? Suppose we underpay? Suppose we over promise? Suppose we cut our training and development? Suppose we bait and switch? Suppose we baffle? Suppose we trick ’em? Suppose we get them with the fine print? Suppose we think, “Well, everybody else is doing it, why not us?”

People are smart. They will see. No matter how short-term appealing it might seem, if we proceed with something that isn’t a win for both them and us, it will always eventually be a lose for us all.

Let’s be the ones people choose over and over because we don’t suppose any of those things.

 

In your corner,

Mike

Today’s photo courtesy of geralt

Getting People Ready to Listen

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Sales and Influence, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1

Having difficulty getting others to see your point of view? Start by demonstrating that you understand theirs.

Having difficulty demonstrating that you understand their point of view? Start by asking them about it.

When people know you have understood them, they quite naturally open to understanding you.

 

In your corner,

Mike

Today’s photo credit: Katy Wrathall Biscuit face via photopin (license)

There Is No Law

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Marketing, Money, Sales and Influence, Strategy
Reading time: 1

There is no law that says we have to compete on price. Despite what people say and what we may fear, we do not need to lower our prices in order to succeed.

The law that does apply is the law of supply and demand. If we honestly provide something rare and valuable then people will happily pay more. What’s rare and valuable? Our understanding of and ability to serve our clients, our ability to work well with others, and our commitment to something bigger than ourselves or this transaction.

Instead of price-cutting, we can race to the top by listening, caring, serving, and improving.

Yes.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: This does not mean we get to raise our prices just because we think we deserve it.

PPS: Another way to see it: we will have all the money we want as a happy by-product of listening, caring, serving, and improving.

 

Today’s photo credit: Eric E Johnson Law books 2 via photopin (license)

Getting Others to See It Your Way

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Sales and Influence, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1

To get others to see things our way, we can try being louder, more energetic, more logical, more polite, or more correct.

Or (and this is much faster) we can first demonstrate to their satisfaction that we understand their way of seeing it.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: jimsheaffer Disco Ball via photopin (license)

How Vulnerable Are You?

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Sales and Influence, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1

Vulnerability, intimacy, caring, and emotional risk.

Mostly we’ve learned to avoid these at work. But, adopted with care, these become our power tools. They build trust which builds all great organizations and differentiates us in the marketplace.

You see, work is intensely personal, human. These tools help us navigate the important issues and emotions we encounter daily. Unless we “go there” with these tools, we run the risk of our businesses stalling due to politics, bureaucracy, lack of commitment, and useless drama.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: And if we want to navigate those important issues and emotions, we have to go first.

 

Today’s photo credit: thebarrowboy cc

Give Consequences or Explore Them

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Sales and Influence
Reading time: 1

We can give consequences so that people don’t screw up. “If you don’t complete this by Friday, we might as well kiss the Fortuna deal goodbye!” Or, “We really need to cut this check now or it’ll delay the project.” Threats like this can work in the short term. But they will damage trust and discourage future cooperation.

Or we can explore consequences together. “We know what Fortuna has asked for. How much can we deliver by Friday? What happens if we don’t? What else can we do?” It may take longer but we’ll build trust, encourage future cooperation, and probably arrive at better solutions.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: nik.golding Looking at me via photopin (license)

How Not To Be Rude When Contacting New People

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Sales and Influence
Reading time: 2 min.

In sales, business development, and networking, our first goal is to open a conversation. That conversation will flow naturally–perhaps in one sitting or many–from getting know each other to exploring each other’s situations, to seeing how we might help each other, and then, if it makes sense, to making some form of agreement.

If this is the flow, how many times should we try to open such a conversation with someone new?  How many calls, emails, or warm introductions should we try before we give up, before we assume we’re being rude? Once? Twice? Three times?

Some of the best in sales and networking will tell us that we should give up only after 10 or 11 tries. If we are genuinely interested in forming a relationship, learning about them, and seeing if we can help them out, then we’d be remiss if we stopped reaching out too soon. We assume they don’t want to hear from us. While that’s true for some, for others they haven’t responded yet because they are busy, unsure, or cautious.

Imagine someone new is trying to get in touch with you. How would they have to behave so that you would appreciate their persistence? Why not be like that?

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit:
alexkerhead
cc

Perfect Pricing (and Salaries)

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Career, Sales and Influence
Reading time: 2 min.

We can set prices (for our salaries or for the products and services we sell) perfectly by following these two rules:

  1. Our clients (or employers) feel like they are getting a great deal.
  2. We feel like we are getting very well paid.

 

Wait. What?! How can we have both of these?

Like this. First, find clients (or employers) who likely have need in the area of business that we’re good at solving. Next, explore with them what they most need in that area, why that’s important, and what would be a conservative estimate for the money saved or gained when they get what they most need. Then ask for a healthy portion (10%, say) of that money and deliver what they most need. What savvy client (or employer) wouldn’t jump at such a deal? And won’t we feel very well paid?

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: If a client or employer doesn’t jump at this deal, they may have more pressing needs in other areas. Or we may have not fully explored this need with our client or employer and their teams.

PPS: If the “healthy portion” isn’t enough to be well paid, we can either offer our products and services to more people or improve our products and services until they deliver a larger amount of savings or gains.

 

Today’s photo credit:
LukeBlacks
cc

They Set the Date

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Sales and Influence
Reading time: 2 min.

A great leadership adage goes, “If I tell you, I still own it. If you tell me, you own it.” If we as leaders say, “Get this done by Wednesday,” then they can feel very justified in thinking, “No way; can’t be done. Or it’ll be done poorly. You just don’t understand reality.”

On the other hand, we can ask, “By when could you get that done to this level of quality?” What will they think of the time commitment that they set? Excitement? Enthusiasm? Even joy? Perhaps. It’s not a guarantee, but they will be much more likely to follow through as promised.

If we absolutely need it by a certain date, we can ask something like, “With how much quality can you complete that by this date?” Or if date and quality are important, we ask, “What (resources) would you need (including, perhaps, re-prioritizing other work) to complete that by this date and with this quality?”

State what you need; let them delight in owning and delivering the rest.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Now, if they push back on what you’re asking for, listen. They may know something important that you need to know.

Today’s photo credit: plenty.r. cc