Pump

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Destructive leadership rations energy. Productive leadership pumps energy into everyone freely.

To share so much, we first have to find and tap for ourselves a virtually unlimited source. And where will find such a source? It’s right here and it’s called appreciation.

 

In your corner,

Mike

Don’t Look Back

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The sages tell us that all our power is in the present. Any time we spend regretting, blaming, or trying to figure out stuff in the past will more likely distract us than help us. Don’t worry about repeating mistakes. We’ve already learned what we could.

Set it aside. The future’s calling.

 

In your corner,

Mike

photo credit: Octubres rotos Wild via photopin (license)

We Have the Tools

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The way out of this mess is not argument, denial, criticism, or righteousness. That only stirs up their defenses and prolongs the pain.

We need to use the other tools–the ones we may have forgotten about: seeing us as all in this together, believing in them and their goodness more than they do, listening, and going for win-win.

We’ve got this.

 

In your corner,

Mike

photo credit: 10b travelling / Carsten ten Brink Bante tools via photopin (license)

To Achieve, Believe

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Sure, we need vision, strategy, and execution. But these alone won’t do. No vision, strategy, or execution survives its first encounter with reality. To navigate the ups and downs, we need a rudder stronger than any plan.

Doubt and criticism are poor rudders; they kill. Belief manages reality and enables vision, strategy, and execution.

Believe in your team–every one of them. Believe in your product. Believe in your clients. And foremost, believe in yourself.

 

In your corner,

Mike

It Only Takes One

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It only takes one person to rise above the drama. It only takes one person to remember the big picture. It only takes one person to commit to the (thus far) impossible. It only takes one person to know that it will all work out better than expected.

It only takes one person because when they do, others notice and follow suit.

Why not let it be you today?

 

In your corner,

Mike

The Expedient Route Often Isn’t

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Things done under pressure often backfire. That person we urgently needed to hire, the deal we really needed to make, and the strategy we didn’t have time to test are classic examples of the pressure-filled decisions that go on to cause much more trouble than they were meant to prevent.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: But delaying decisions isn’t helpful either. Figure out what’s true now, what you want to be true, and why. Then decide and do the very next step and repeat until done.

Put On Your Mask First

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Will=Our inner game
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That people around us are struggling, blaming, deflecting, or otherwise full of drama does not mean that we need to do the same.

You see, no amount of us struggling, etc. can ever help them. If we’re down, we can’t help them. Only when we are plugged in, feeling good can we ever have the energy, ideas, and resources to help them.

Put on your mask first, good leader, then help.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s image courtesy of K. Todd Storch

Who Says?

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Will=Our inner game
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It will be hard. Who says?

It won’t work. Who says?

It will be a long shot. Who says?

I can’t. I don’t know how. I don’t think I can. Who says?

It’ll work out. It always does. I don’t know how but I bet it’ll happen soon. I’m kinda lucky that way. Who says?

The truth? You say. And what you say has a very strange way of happening. 

So, what do you say?

 

In your corner,

Mike

Why Can’t They Just Do What I Tell Them?

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Because they (and you and I) are wired to seek delight, growth, and freedom. How is doing what we say they should do at all in line with that wiring?

“But we’re paying them to do their jobs. Isn’t that good enough?” we might ask.

All the evidence says, “Nope. Certainly not these days.” And it’s not just the Millennials.

So we have to go for win-win. We have to include what they want in what we want.

How? Luckily, it’s not as daunting as it might seem. More on that tomorrow.

For now, try this exercise: how many times today did you ask your team, colleagues, boss, and clients to do something you wanted (needed, hoped for) them to do? And how many times did you listen to what–however large or small–they wanted, needed, or desired?

 

In your corner,

Mike