Quietly

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

Here’s an unusual but powerful way to add value: when the rest of the world (or at least the rest of the people in the meeting) are flying off the handle, we can remain calm. We need not say anything. We only need to stay present, breathing. They may not acknowledge or even recognize what we’re doing. But the impact can be profound.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: CarbonNYC [in SF!] Good Lucifer: My Friend Michael via photopin (license)

Leading When Beliefs Go Rogue

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

Labels, judgments, yeah buts, and other beliefs about the way things are can help but often stop helping us. They go rogue.

We can tell that a belief has gone rogue on us in two ways. First, we feel bad when we think it. We often attribute the bad feeling to whatever we’re considering. “I feel bad because she’s this way, he’s that way, I’m this way, and things are going badly the other way.” But it’s really a signal from the wiser parts of us warning that we’re thinking about things in a less than helpful way. Second, we aren’t getting the results we want.

Our hard work as leaders is not in making things happen or getting people to do good stuff. It’s in tuning our thinking–especially long-held but rogue beliefs–to what feels better.  And this makes way for people to do good stuff and for good things to happen.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Yes, you are that powerful, dear leader.

 

Today’s photo credit: johnrothiemurchus Over the parapet via photopin (license)

Vulnerable Leader

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

Lack of vulnerability, often taking the form of puffery, aloofness, or bullying, demonstrates lack of strength. Vulnerability requires and is strength.

But why do we need to be strong and vulnerable? Because, except under clear and present emergencies, people follow us to the extent we share our vulnerabilities.

 

In your corner,

Mike

Today’s photo credit: Corine Bliek Gosling via photopin (license)

Inspirational Fail

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

Inspirational posters and Instagram posts typically fail us. That’s because wise words do not transmit wisdom, they only coax us toward wisdom if we’re ready.  Unless we’re buzzing high enough, we will hear or read wise things and miss the importance or, worse, totally misinterpret the meaning.

This means we need to raise our buzz to understand and use wisdom.

And it means we cannot expect others to change just because we’ve laid out the logic, made the case, showed the way, or otherwise implored them. We can, however, influence them by raising our buzz, leading by the example of our behavior, learning what makes a win for them, and connecting our wins to theirs.

Be wise, good leader.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Ian D. Keating Into The Light via photopin (license)

Tell Us Why

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

To fix a long-standing problem in a company, step away from it. Start over-communicating why fixing this problem is so important. 

When they understand the why–and when the why is compelling and believable–people are then able to jump in with the solutions we need.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: diverdewan15 Calling Grey Gull (Leucophaeus modestus) via photopin (license)

Why We Should Resist Solving Their Problems

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

When people are buzzing low, they will almost always present us with problems and complaints. If we’re not careful, we’ll get drawn into the trap of trying to solve or resolve these for them. 

Why is this a trap? Because their low buzz can easily push down our buzz. They feel bad. We react. Then we struggle to improve things from a lower buzz. This is very hard to do. And if we manage it, they’ll just come back next time with another low-buzz problem.

Instead, let’s raise our buzz around them. Without trying, they will find it much easier to start buzzing higher themselves. Then their solutions and resolutions become easy.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: AMagill Patience via photopin (license)