Tell Us Why

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

To fix a long-standing problem in a company, step away from it. Start over-communicating why fixing this problem is so important. 

When they understand the why–and when the why is compelling and believable–people are then able to jump in with the solutions we need.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: diverdewan15 Calling Grey Gull (Leucophaeus modestus) via photopin (license)

Why We Should Resist Solving Their Problems

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter, Will=Our inner game
Reading time: 1 min.

When people are buzzing low, they will almost always present us with problems and complaints. If we’re not careful, we’ll get drawn into the trap of trying to solve or resolve these for them. 

Why is this a trap? Because their low buzz can easily push down our buzz. They feel bad. We react. Then we struggle to improve things from a lower buzz. This is very hard to do. And if we manage it, they’ll just come back next time with another low-buzz problem.

Instead, let’s raise our buzz around them. Without trying, they will find it much easier to start buzzing higher themselves. Then their solutions and resolutions become easy.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: AMagill Patience via photopin (license)

A Deep Insight

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Growth, Leading, Organizations, Success, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

It can look like complaint, frustration, withdrawal, fear, defensiveness, anger, worry, guilt, pushing, or avoiding. No matter. If anything has led you to believe that you are separate, above, below, isolated, or disconnected from any and all others, please–please–look again.

The deep-down insight here is that, despite appearances, all of us are intimately connected. We are not only all in this together, we are all this together.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: And, despite appearances, we each can experience this deep-down insight first-hand. It usually sneaks up on us and feels a-bit-scary-a-lot-wonderful.

PPS: When we get this, business and life flows so much better.

PPPS: And then we unleash all that creativity, fun, and success we’ve suspected was always there.

PPPPS: Too vague? Too esoteric? Yah, that happens.  A tip: pretend “we are one” is true and see what happens.

PPPPPS: A big part of our job as leaders is to hold this open for others to get, too.

 

Today’s photo credit: modesrodriguez Cosmos via photopin (license)

How to Have Simple and Effective Processes

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Do=Natural flow of action, Leading, Systems
Reading time: 1 min.

Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.

–Albert Einstein

Our companies thrive when we have the simplest possible systems, processes, and policies. Anything too simple would be incomplete and cause confusion and waste. Anything too cumbersome will slow us down.

How, then, would we put Einstein’s advice into practice? It’s simple, of course! For any system, process, or policy,

  • Work back from the desired results. Start at the end and ask, “What do we need to have this outcome?” Then repeat the question until we get to the beginning. Whatever we build will be as simple as possible. Desired results describe what we want to happen for how much investment of time, energy, and money.
  • Add safeguards to address only those potential errors with unacceptably high expected costs (probability of it occurring times cost in relationship currency, dollars, and time).
  • Agree to revisit/redesign the systems, process, or policy whenever the desired results (outcomes and/or investment needed to get those outcomes) start slipping.

Simple.

 

In your corner,

Mike

Today’s photo credit: photosteve101 Pencil’s nib / pencil close up / macro / with with cross-section paper via photopin (license)

No Psychology Required

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

We can get into trouble trying to analyze people whose behaviors confound us. We humans are complex; even the experts stumble trying to figure out people’s personalities. More important: the more we focus on what (we think) is wrong with them, the more they will get stuck there.

To get people unstuck, let’s instead take small steps, focus on desired behavior, and express our belief in their ability to improve.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: [Yes, this is Freud’s office.] Alessandro Grussu Londra-215 via photopin (license)

In a World…

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

In a world where most people think of themselves as their thoughts and feelings, we who regularly connect with the wiser part of ourselves become natural leaders. We need not hold any positions or titles. We don’t try to do anything special. We do watch our buzz levels. Then calm and inspiration just sorta happen.

Weird, ya?

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: Tømas Solid Geometry via photopin (license)

Delegation Economics

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading
Reading time: 1 min.

When choosing whether to do something ourselves or to give it to a keen but possibly inexpert team member, we’re almost always better off it we err towards them doing it. Once they learn, we are free to tackle the valuable things that we couldn’t get to because we were busy doing their stuff.

 

In your corner,

Mike

 

Today’s photo credit: wwarby Pound Coins via photopin (license)

Stated Simply 

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Leading, We=All Who Matter
Reading time: 1 min.

Criticize to hold people in place. Encourage to help them grow.

 

In your corner,

Mike

PS: Proof of the above is left to you to compare with your own experience.

PPS: There’s a huge difference between criticizing and noting something that’s not up to par. The former always generates further dysfunction. The latter is necessary and opens the door to better performance and satisfaction.

 

Today’s photo credit: ShinyPhotoScotland Dusk on Loch Tay via photopin (license)